Sharing Stocks Program with Museum of American Finance – MOAF

             
                       Bob Kerstein, Founder Scripophily.com
                   Chris Meyers, Director of Education, MOAF

5:34

What is the Sharing Stocks program?

2

7:10

Sharing Stocks Part 1: What happened to Pan Am?

3

7:04

Sharing Stocks Part 2: What happened to General Motors?

4

9:40

Sharing Stocks Part 3: What happened to Penn Central?

5

15:26

Sharing Stocks Part 4: How do stock certificates work?

Scripophily is offering Free Shipping and Seatrain Lines. Stock Certificate with all Orders Plus Free certificate signed by George Bush’s Grandfather with Orders over $200

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Samuel Prescott Bush was the President of Buckeye Steel Castings. He is the Grandfather of President George H. W. Bush, and the Great Grandfather of President George W. Bush and Governor Jeb Bush.

Buckeye Steel Castings Stock Certificate signed by Samuel Prescott Bush

Old Stock and Bond Certificates Make Great Gifts for the Holidays

Scripophily.com ®, the Internet’s largest buyer and seller of collectible stock and bond certificates, is is offering free shipping and a Seatrain Lines. stock certificate with all orders plus a free Buckeye Steel Castings Inc stock certificate signed by George Bush’s Grandfather with all orders over $200.

Samuel P. Bush ( Samuel Prescott Bush b. 1863. d. 1948) was the President of the Buckeye Steel Castings Co. in Columbus, Ohio, makers of railcar parts from 1907 – 1927. His entire career had been in the railroad business– supplying equipment to the Wall Street-owned railroad systems. Samuel Prescott Bush, was a close adviser to President Hoover. Samuel P. Bush was also the first president of the National Association of Manufacturers.

Samuel Prescott Bush was a member of the Stevens Institute of Technology class of 1884. Bush was on the varsity football and baseball teams, and belonged to the tennis club and served a term as a director of the Stevens Athletic Association, all while earning his bachelor’s degree. In the early 1890s, Bush assisted Ohio State football coach Jack Ryder and helped organize an amateur baseball league in Columbus – – he played second base on the Pennsylvania Railroad Columbus Shop team. In 1892 he and two others organized one of Columbus’s first tennis clubs. Later, as a charter member of the Scioto Country Club in that city, he chaired the club’s golf- course construction committee. Bush, who died in 1948, was a noted industrialist — railroads and steel were his businesses — who also performed extensive civic and community service. Stevens recognized that service in 1947 by awarding him an honorary – degree of doctor of engineering.

Samuel is the Grandfather of President G. W. Bush, the Father of Prescott S. Bush (Prescott Bush, was a senator and the tallest man in the Senate for many years) and the Great Grandfather of President George W. Bush and Governor Jeb Bush. Samuel married Flora Sheldon, daughter of Robert Emmet Sheldon and Mary Elizabeth Butler, on 20 Jun 1894 in Columbus, OH.

Stock certificates are collected and given as gifts because of their historical significance, beauty and artwork, autographs, notoriety, as well as many other factors. The supply of new certificates reaching the collector market has been substantially reduced due to changes in state laws and stock exchanges rules. Many companies are no longer required to issue physical stock and bond certificates, a process called “dematerialization.”

Scripophily (scrip-ah-fil-ly) is the name of the hobby of collecting old stock and bond certificates. Certificate values range from a few dollars to more than $500,000 for the most unique and rare items. Tens of thousands of Scripophily buyers worldwide include casual collectors, corporate archives, business executives, museums and serious collectors. Due to the computer age, more and more stock and bonds are issued electronically which means fewer paper certificates are being issued. As a result, demand for paper certificates is increasing while supply is decreasing.

Our company has been featured on CNBC, USA Today, Associated Press, Reuters, Nightline, Today Show, Baltimore Sun, and Washington Post and in many other media publications. Scripophily.com has items on display in museums around the world.

The company also offers the World’s #1 old stock research service at OldCompany.com and offers high resolution scans for publications. Scripophily.com has over 16,500 selections on its website.

Scripophily.com /Old Company Research Service, founding member of the Old Stock Exchange, is the successor company to all material published by the Marvyn Scudders Manuals, the Robert D. Fisher Manuals,R.M. Smythe Stock Research Service, and the Herzog & Co., Inc. obsolete research services. These services have been performed continuously for over 137 years since 1880. We are the leading provider of authentic stock certificates, autographs, and old company stock research services.

Scripophily.com and Old Company Research Services was founded by Bob Kerstein (Bob.com). Bob is a CPA and CGMA, and has more than 41 years of senior management experience in the Cellular, Cable TV, Satellite, Internet, Professional Sports and Entertainment Industries. Bob is also the President of the Professional Scripophily Traders Association (PSTA).

For more information on Scripophily.com®, visit https://www.scripophily.comhttps://www.oldcompany.comhttps://www.scripophily.nethttp://www.rambo.comhttp://www.bob.com or call 1-703-787-3552

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Scripophily.com 
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OldCompany.com / RM Smythe Business Research Service Celebrates 137 Years of Continuous Old Stock and Bond Research Since 1880

OldCompany.com / RM Smythe Business Research Service Celebrates 137 Years of Continuous Old Stock and Bond Research Since 1880

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Old Company Research is the successor to RM Smythe Stock Research Service and is the publisher of all material of the Marvyn Scudders Manuals, the Robert D. Fisher Manuals, R.M. Smythe stock research archives, and the Herzog & Co., Inc. obsolete research services. Professional researching of old stock and bond certificates provides information in determining redeemable worth as a financial security and collectible value. Old Stock Certificates may have value and should always be investigated before they are disposed.

Bob Kerstein – The Old Stock Detective

An old stock or bond certificate may still be valuable even if it no longer trades under the name printed on the certificate.

Old Company Research Service (OldCompany.com) is celebrating 137 years of continuous old stock and bond research services. The service was founded in 1880 by Roland M. Smythe and was later expanded with the addition of Marvyn Scudder and Robert D. Fisher. In 2011, Scripophily.com, the parent company of Old Company Research Service, acquired the old stock & bond business research service correspondence, archives and copyrights from Herzog & Co., Inc. (formally R.M. Smythe Old Stock Research Services). The acquisition included all reference material published by the Marvyn Scudders Manuals, the Robert D. Fisher Manuals, and Herzog & Co., Inc.

Since the acquisition, we have successfully integrated the archives, repositories and resources into our proprietary information management systems. Under the direction of trained old stock research professionals, the data merger has ensured our continual commitment to quality and value with efficient access to this previously hard to recover information for a cost effective price.

The old company and securities research service provides investigative analysis for financial and accounting firms, professionals, attorneys, investors, estates and trusts in cases of questioned securities and lost company identities. The research investigations will probe into the corporate history, capital changes, mergers, acquisitions, bankruptcies, legal proceedings, regulatory filings, and analysis of companies to assess the disposition of financial holdings.

In addition to the potential redeemable value sought by investors, Scripophily.com offers insight into the secondary historical finance market by assessing any possible collectible value. SCRIPOPHILY is the hobby of collecting authentic old stock and bond certificates. The name resulted from the combining of the English and Greek words “scrip” represents an ownership right and the word “philos” meaning to love.

Scripophily.com is the Internets leading buyer and seller of collectible stock and bond certificates, and old stock research at OldCompany.com. The company has had items on display in the Museum of American Finance in New York, an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution. Scripophily.com has been featured on CNBC, Today Show, Inside Edition, Associated Press, USA Today, Baltimore Sun, Washington Post and in many other media publications.. Our online store has over 17,500 selections including categories such as Frauds, Scandals, Bankruptcies, Dot Coms, as well as the traditional American industries.

Scripophily.com /Old Company Research Service, founding member of the Old Stock Exchange, is the successor company to all material published by the Marvyn Scudders Manuals, the Robert D. Fisher Manuals, R.M. Smythe Stock Research Service, and the Herzog & Co., Inc. obsolete research services. These services have been performed continuously for over 137 years since 1880. We are the leading provider of authentic stock certificates, autographs, and old company stock research services.

Scripophily.com and Old Company Research Services was founded by Bob Kerstein (Bob.com). Bob is a CPA and CGMA, and has more than 41 years of senior management experience in the Cellular, Cable TV, Satellite, Internet, Professional Sports and Entertainment Industries. Bob is also the President of the Professional Scripophily Traders Association (PSTA).

For more information on Scripophily.com®, visit https://www.scripophily.comhttps://www.oldcompany.comhttps://www.scripophily.nethttp://www.rambo.comhttp://www.bob.com or call 1-703-787-3552.

Scripophily.com celebrates 20 years on the Internet

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House of Representatives Check

All Orders will receive an authentic United States House of Representatives Sergeant of Arms Signed Check

and

Atari Stock Certificate

all orders over $200 receive an authentic Atari Corporation stock certificate

20 years ago, no one knew what the word Scripophily meant. Now it is all over the Internet, and is defined in encyclopedias and dictionaries, used in spelling bee’s,and has its own category on eBay, and is listed on Google over 370,000 times.

Scripophily.com®, the Internet’s largest buyer and seller of collectible stock and bond certificates is celebrating 20 years on the Internet by offering an authentic free United States House of Representatives Sergeant of Arms signed check from the 1950’s with all orders plus a free Atari Corporation – Famous pioneer video game (Pong) Company stock certificate with all orders over $200.

Scripophily.com opened its virtual doors in 1996 with a mission to use the Internet to transform the hobby of collecting stock and bond certificates as the fastest, easiest, and most enjoyable shopping experience possible. While our customer base and product offerings have grown considerably since our early days, we still maintain our founding commitment to customer satisfaction and the delivery of an educational product and an enjoyable shopping experience.

The authentic Sergeant of Arms House of Representatives signed check we are offering is from the United States Government issued in the 1950’s. This historic document has a vignette of the U.S. Capitol in the background and has been hand signed. The Sergeant at Arms of the United States House of Representatives is an officer of the House with law enforcement, protocol, and administrative responsibilities. The Sergeant at Arms is elected at the beginning of each Congress by the membership of the House.

The Atari Corporation Stock Certificate is issued no later than 1992 and was printed by the United States Banknote Corporation. This has an image of the famous company logo and has the printed signature of the company’s president, Jack Tramiel. These certificates are highly desirable and very collectible.

Scripophily (scrip-ah-fil-ly) is the name of the hobby of collecting old stock and bond certificates. Certificate values range from a few dollars to more than $500,000 for the most unique and rare items. Tens of thousands of Scripophily buyers worldwide include casual collectors, corporate archives, business executives, museums and serious collectors. Due to the computer age, more and more stock and bonds are issued electronically which means fewer paper certificates are being issued. As a result, demand for paper certificates is increasing while supply is decreasing.

Certificates are collected and given as gifts because of their historical significance, beauty and artwork, autographs, notoriety, as well as many other factors. Old Greek, Chinese, Confederate and Panama Canal bond certificates have been very popular this year. In addition, scandals like Lehman Bros. and Enron, and stock certificates signed by John D. Rockefeller and other famous businessmen continue to be our top sellers.

The supply of new certificates reaching the collector market has been substantially reduced due to changes in state laws and stock exchanges rules. Many companies are no longer required to issue physical stock and bond certificates by stock exchanges and the Securities and Exchange Commission, a process called “dematerialization.” Stock certificates can now be registered and transferred electronically. Paper stock certificates are slowly being removed and retired from circulation in exchange for electronic recording. This means fewer new paper certificates are reaching the market and older ones are destroyed when they are redeemed. As a result, the supply of paper stock certificates is significantly reduced.

In 2011, Scripophily.com, the parent company of Old Company Research Service, acquired the old stock & bond business research service correspondence, archives and copyrights from Herzog & Co., Inc. (formally R.M. Smythe Old Stock Research Services). The acquisition included rights to all reference material published by the Marvyn Scudders Manuals, the Robert D. Fisher Manuals, and Herzog & Co., Inc. as well as all correspondence from the R.M. Smythe Special Library used in the Smythe’s Obsolete Research activities which began in 1880.

Scripophily.com – The Gift of History is the Internet’s leading buyer and seller of collectible stock and bond certificates and has items on loan for display in the Smithsonian’s Museum of Financial History in New York. Our company has been featured on CNBC, USA Today, Associated Press, Reuters, Nightline, Today Show, Baltimore Sun, and Washington Post and in many other media publications. The company also offers the World’s #1 old stock research service at OldCompany.com and offers high resolution scans for publications. Scripophily.com has over 17,500 selections on its website.

Scripophily.com /Old Company Research Service, founding member of the Old Stock Exchange, is the successor company to all material published by the Marvyn Scudders Manuals, the Robert D. Fisher Manuals, R.M. Smythe Stock Research Service, and the Herzog & Co., Inc. obsolete research services.

Scripophily.com and Old Company Research Services was founded by Bob Kerstein (Bob.com). Bob is a CPA and CGMA, and has more than 40 years of senior management experience in the Cellular, Cable TV, Satellite, Internet, Professional Sports and Entertainment Industries. Bob is also the President of the Professional Scripophily Traders Association (PSTA) and co founder of the American Stock and Bond Collectors Association.

For more information on Scripophily.com®, visit http://www.scripophily.com, http://www.oldcompany.com, http://www.scripophily.net, http://www.bestservice.com, http://www.bob.com or call 1-703-787-3552.
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PRWeb ebooks – Another online visibility tool from PRWeb Scripophily.com celebrates 20 years on the Interne

Scripophily.com is celebrating National Library Workers Day on April 12, 2016, by offering a stock certificate signed by the Dewey Decimal System Originator, Melvin Dewey

Boston Globe  – April 112016,  Scripophily.com is celebrating National Library Workers Day on April 12,
2016, by offering a stock certificate signed by the Dewey Decimal System
Originator, Melvin Dewey

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The Dewey Decimal System is a proprietary library classification system first published in the United States by Melvin Dewey in 1876. Dewey signed this stock certificate in 1922 when he became the president of the Lake Placid Company.

News Image

Lake Placid Company signed by Melvin Dewey

What the heck is the Dewey Decimal System?

Scripophily.com is offering a historic stock certificate issued by the Lake Placid Company in 1922. This historic document has an ornate border around it with a vignette of an eagle. The certificate has an embossed corporate seal and is hand signed by Melvin Dewey as president and is over 94 years old.

Melvin Dewey (1851-1931) was the inventor of the Dewey Decimal System which introduced the concepts of relative location and relative index which allow new books to be added to a library in their appropriate location based on subject. He was also a trailblazer in numerous American educational and professional organizations during the last quarter of the 19th century. He founded the American Library Association, the Association of State Librarians, the Children’s Library Association, and the New York Library Club. Moving to Columbia University as chief librarian in 1883, he founded the nation’s first library school there in 1887. In 1889, he was appointed director of the New York State Library, a position which he held until his retirement in 1906.

The Lake Placid Club, owned by the Lake Placid Company, was headquartered in Lake Placid, New York, and was founded by Melvin Dewey in 1893. The Club’s first members were professors, teachers, clergy, writers, and librarians. High standards and unique natural surroundings soon attracted those of means who shared the same interest in intellect and recreation. In 1906, winterized buildings were open for year-round use. By 1923, through vision and true entrepreneurship, the Club had expanded to 9,600 acres with a staff of over 1,100. At that time there were 356 buildings, 110 of which were residences; 21 tennis courts, and 7 golf courses Melville Dewey, founder of the Lake Placid Club. The club became world famous for hosting the 1932 and 1980 Olympic Winter Games.

Scripophily (scrip-ah-fil-ly) is the name of the hobby of collecting old stock and bond certificates. Certificate values range from a few dollars to more than $500,000 for the most unique and rare items. Tens of thousands of Scripophily buyers worldwide include casual collectors, corporate archives, business executives, museums and serious collectors. Due to the computer age, more and more stock and bonds are issued electronically which means fewer paper certificates are being issued. As a result, demand for paper certificates is increasing while supply is decreasing.

Scripophily.com – The Gift of History is the Internet’s leading buyer and seller of collectible stock and bond certificates and has items on loan for display in the Smithsonian’s Museum of Financial History in New York. Our company has been featured on CNBC, USA Today, Associated Press, Reuters, Nightline, Today Show, Baltimore Sun, and Washington Post and in many other media publications. The company also offers the World’s #1 old stock research service at OldCompany.com and offers high resolution scans for publications. Scripophily.com has over 17,500 selections on its website.
Scripophily.com /Old Company Research Service, founding member of the Old Stock Exchange, is the successor company to all material published by the Marvyn Scudders Manuals, the Robert D. Fisher Manuals, R.M. Smythe Stock Research Service, and the Herzog & Co., Inc. obsolete research services. These services have been performed continuously for over 136 years since 1880.

Scripophily.com and Old Company Research Services was founded by Bob Kerstein (Bob.com). Bob is a CPA and CGMA, and has more than 39 years of senior management experience in the Cellular, Cable TV, Satellite, Internet, Professional Sports and Entertainment Industries. Bob is also the President of the Professional Scripophily Traders Association (PSTA) and co founder of the American Stock and Bond Collectors Association.
For more information on Scripophily.com®, visit http://www.scripophily.com, http://www.oldcompany.com, http://www.scripophily.net, http://www.rambo.com, http://www.bob.com or call 1-703-787-3552.

Playboy Stock Certificates – New York Post

Dear John: What can I do with these Playboy stock certificates?
By John Crudele

New York PostMarch 19, 2016 | 10:00pm
These old certificates could possibly fetch $60 from collectors, according to Bob.com Kerstein, founder and chief executive of Scripophily.com, which …

Dear John:

Dear John: I found stock certificates for Playboy in a box in my closet. I took them to ScottTrade to sell, but they said they couldn’t help me.

I have been trying to track this down on my own, but got nowhere. Maybe you can point me in the right direction. I know it’s not much money, but it’s mine. B.V.

Dear B.V.: Playboy was taken private in 2011, and shareholders were paid $6.15 a share. You have one certificate for seven Class A shares and another for 21 Class B shares. So, in all, that would have been worth $172.20.

You can still cash these in by contacting Playboy’s transfer agent at the time, American Stock Transfer Co. in Brooklyn. The phone number is (888) 328-5369. There are some forms you will have to fill out.

But there is a lot more to the story about Playboy’s stock.

The certificates you showed me have a picture of a woman in flowing robes holding the globe. There’s a composite of various cities in the background.

These old certificates could possibly fetch $60 from collectors, according to Bob Kerstein, founder and chief executive of Scripophily.com, which deals in collectibles.

http://ep.yimg.com/ay/scripophily/playboy-enterprises-inc-24.gifBut that’s not the most interesting part of this story.

Before the ones you own were issued, Playboy certificates had the image of a naked woman at the top — the February 1971 Playmate named Willy Rey (real name: Wilhelmina Rietveld), who posed for the image when Playboy went public that year.

Those certificates, says Kerstein, are worth between $125 and $150 if they are in gold, and between $150 and $200 if they are blue.

Tragically, Willy Rey died of an overdose of sleeping pills in 1973 when she was 23 years old.

Her image stayed on the Playboy stock certificates until 1990, when the company recapitalized.

Why did Rey’s image get the boot? “The stock certificate quickly became a novelty, and at one point there were about 14,000 single shareholders,” making it costly for the company to keep issuing so many single shares, a Playboy spokesperson told me.
Dear Readers,

Your letters to John Crudele are streaming in fast and furiously, asking Dear John to right the wrongs you’re facing. Because of this influx, The Post Business section will feature more of your inquiries in the hope of helping you with your troubles.

Send your questions to Dear John, The New York Post, 1211 Ave. of the Americas, NY, NY 10036, or john.crudele@nypost.com

Donald Trump’s Stock Is Rising, But Not in the Way You Think

Donald Trump’s Stock Is Rising, But Not in the Way You Think

Donald Trump’s stock is rising, and not just among the electorate.

Original stock certificates from Trump Entertainment Resorts, Trump’s thrice-bankrupt holding company for his Atlantic City hotel and casino properties the Trump Taj Mahal and Trump Plaza, have seen a significant jump in interest and value since the billionaire businessman became a politician — even though the stock itself hasn’t been trading for quite some time.

Videos About Scripophily

Google Search Results

Historische Wertpapiere – Old Stocks and Bonds – Scripophily

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mtPeAlyIsd4
Mar 18, 2014 – Uploaded by Matthias Schmitt

Das Video zeigt die 50 Highlights der 33. Auktion für Historische Wertpapiere der HWPH AG am 26. April …

Historische Wertpapiere – Old Stocks and Bonds – Scripophily

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UV_Ech-7ZYA
Sep 16, 2013 – Uploaded by Matthias Schmitt

Das Video zeigt die 50 Highlights der 31. Auktion für Historische Wertpapiere der HWPH AG am 26 …

www.bloomberg.com/research/stocks/…/snapshot.asp?…

Scripophily.com LLC company research & investing information. Find executives and the latest company news.

Scripophily – Chinese stocks and bonds – YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EYUZEByBjC0
Jan 1, 2010 – Uploaded by paul linton

Scripophily is the study and collection of stocks and bonds www.chinesebondshop.com UK seller/supplier …

Correct way to erase pencil markings in scripophily – YouTube

www.youtube.com/watch?v=2oSIiwuVyYo
Jan 21, 2012 – Uploaded by Franky Leeuwerck

Correct way to erase pencil markings from dealers on old shares and bond certificates. Franky’s Scripophily

Historische Wertpapiere – Old Stocks and Bonds – Scripophily

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=upLRKMAM50k
Sep 12, 2014 – Uploaded by Matthias Schmitt

Das Video zeigt die 50 Highlights der 35. Auktion für Historische Wertpapiere der HWPH AG am 18 …

Bob.com Kerstein on CNBC discussing Scripophily / Old …

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PTp8OMx1ptU
Jul 26, 2008 – Uploaded by Bob Kerstein

Bob.com Kerstein on CNBC discussing Scripophily / Old Stocks

Scripophily – YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tqqX31_BgNQ
Apr 26, 2014 – Uploaded by Rankinvid – Intelligent Video for Search Engine Visibility

ARCHIVES INTERNATIONAL AUCTIONS Part XIX U.S. & Worldwide Banknotes, Scripophily & Security …

Scripophily.com’s CEO Bob Kerstein with Michelle Caruso …

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YH7OU2gbSPU
Mar 5, 2013 – Uploaded by Bob Kerstein

Disussion of the trends in the hobby of Scripophily which is the hobby of collecting Stock and Bond certificates.

Highlights der 39. Scripophily-Auktion für Historische …

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=05GS4Ryf7ps
Sep 7, 2015 – Uploaded by Matthias Schmitt

Das Video zeigt die 50 Highlights unserer 39. Scripophily-Auktion für Historische Wertpapiere am 17 …

Facebook IPO Stock Certificate with Jane Wells, CNBC and …

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CxGkjBgnFB8
May 16, 2012 – Uploaded by Bob Kerstein

… with Jane Wells, CNBC and Bob Kerstein, Scripophily.com / Bob.com … bond certificates (a hobby called …

International Scripophily Exchange – Bloomberg

www.bloomberg.com/research/stocks/…/snapshot.asp?…

International Scripophily Exchange company research & investing information. Find executives and the …

Archives International Auctions Part XXXI | Worldwide …

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q9DXsj7AVMA
3 days ago – Uploaded by Auctioneersvault

SESSION 1 (Lots 1 to 899): U.S. & Worldwide Banknotes, Scripophily & Security Printing Ephemera – Live …

Scripophily Book: China’s Foreign Debt, Wilhelm Kuhlmann …

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XBdB4kb1vDg
Oct 8, 2013 – Uploaded by Matthias Schmitt

I present the book China’s Foreign Debt from Wilhelm Kuhlmann. If you are interested in this Scripophily book …

Scripophily – YouTube

www.youtube.com/watch?v=ksm03Wad-4I
Nov 6, 2012 – Uploaded by Christopher Hunt

An Easy Overview Of Scripophily. … Historische Wertpapiere – Old Stocks and Bonds – Scripophily

Scripophily – YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qg7-bwfkp-Y
Sep 4, 2015 – Uploaded by Auctioneersvault

Archives International Part XXVIII September 17th, 2015 http://archivesinternational.auctioneersvault …

scripophily hologram – YouTube

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May 21, 2011 – Uploaded by Franky Leeuwerck

This hologram of an American eagle appears on a specimen certificate of the Golden Eagle International …

Disston Land Company signed by Hamilton Disston (Florida Land Company) – 1894

History from Bob.com, Founder Scripophily.com

Beautifully RARE certificate from the Disston Land Company issued in 1894. This historic document was printed by the W. F. Murray’s & Son Company of Philadelphia and has an ornate border around it with a vignette of an eagle in the center flanks by palm trees and a lake. This item has the signatures of the Company’s President, Hamilton Disston and is over 112 years old. 17 coupons attached on bottom (not shown in scan).

Scripophily.com is a name you can TRUST!
Certificate Vignette
 

Scripophily.com is a name you can TRUST!
Hamilton Disston’s Signature
 

Scripophily.com is a name you can TRUST!
Bond showing some coupons
 

Scripophily.com is a name you can TRUST!
New York Times Article – May 1, 1896
 

Scripophily.com is a name you can TRUST!
New York Times Article – July 12, 1900
 

Hamilton Disston (August 23, 1844 – April 30, 1896), was an industrialist and real-estate developer who purchased four million acres (16,000 km²) of Florida land in 1881, an area larger than the state of Connecticut, and reportedly the most land ever purchased by a single person in world history. Disston was the son of Pennsylvania-based industrialist Henry Disston who formed Disston & Sons Saw Works, which Hamilton later ran and which was one of the largest saw manufacturing companies in the world.

Hamilton Disston’s investment in the infrastructure of Florida spurred growth throughout the state. His related efforts to drain the Everglades triggered the state’s first land boom with numerous towns and cities established through the area. Disston’s land purchase and investments were directly responsible for creating or fostering the towns of Kissimmee, St. Cloud, Gulfport, Tarpon Springs, and indirectly aided the rapid growth of St. Petersburg, Florida. He furthermore oversaw the successful cultivation of rice and sugarcane near the Kissimmee area.

Although Disston’s engineered canals aided water transport and steamboat traffic in Florida, he was ultimately unsuccessful in draining the Kissimmee River floodplain or lowering the surface water around Lake Okeechobee and in the Everglades. He was forced to sell much of his investments at a fraction of their original costs. However, his land purchase primed Florida’s economy and allowed railroad magnates Henry Flagler and Henry Plant to build rail lines down the east coast of Florida, and another joining the west coast, which directly led to the domination of the tourist and citrus industries in Florida. Disston’s immediate impact was in the Philadelphia area, where he was active in Republican politics and a philanthropist, but his legacy is often associated with the draining and development of Florida.

Hamilton Disston was born in Philadelphia, the eldest son of nine children born to Mary Steelman and Henry Disston, an English immigrant and descendant of French nobility. Disston’s father was a successful industrialist who rose from being orphaned just days after arriving in the United States to running the highly lucrative Keystone Saw Works when Hamilton was a child. Henry Disston was responsible for multiple machining and saw patents, and in the spirit of Victorian-era paternalism, envisioned and engineered a community around his steel factory in Tacony, Pennsylvania. After attending public school, Hamilton left at 15 years old, opting for an apprenticeship at the saw factory which, by that time, was a $500,000-per-year international venture. His father threatened to fire him for repeatedly leaving the factory to work for a volunteer fire department. Hamilton twice joined the Union Army only to have Henry purchase his release, but Hamilton organized a Company of saw factory employees during the Gettysburg Campaign. Henry finally agreed to support the “Disston Volunteers” financially.

After the American Civil War, Hamilton Disston returned to work in his father’s factory as an executive. In 1878, following the death of Henry Disston, Hamilton and his brothers Horace, William, and Jacob inherited the company which had been renamed to Henry Disston & Sons. Hamilton became the controlling member of the 2,000-employee company and expanded production to 1.4 million hacksaws and three million files per year. Only a month after Henry’s death, Hamilton gave President Rutherford B. Hayes a tour of the factory where an unshaped piece of steel was manufactured into a 26-inch (660 mm) hand saw in only 42 minutes, and was presented to the president at the end of the tour—etched with his name.

While the saw manufacturing business continued growing, Disston branched out, investing in a chemical firm, a Chinese railroad, real estate in Atlantic City, New Jersey and mining in the western United States.

In the 1840s and 1850s, the sparsely populated state of Florida came to own approximately 15,000,000 acres (61,000 km2) of mostly swamp land, granted by the U.S. Congress to states with wetlands for the purpose of reclaiming the land under water by constructing canals and levees. In Florida, consolidated grants for the purpose of building rail infrastructure and reclaiming wetlands were placed in a trust called the Internal Improvement Fund of the State of Florida (IIF). The trust fund was managed by the Governor of Florida and four state officials. The fund pledged land to railroad companies and guaranteed bonds issued by the railroad companies on the land. When the high costs associated with the American Civil War and Reconstruction caused railroad companies to default on the bonds, the fund became liable and rapidly sank into debt and eventually into Federal Court receivership. By the time Governor George Franklin Drew took office in 1877, the fund was nearly $1 million in debt. The state constitution forbade issuing bonds to repay it; investors were not interested in Florida, no rail lines were built, and progress in the state stalled.

In 1877, diplomat Henry Shelton Sanford invited Disston, an avid sport fisherman, on a fishing trip through Florida.[13][14][7] During the trip, Disston realized the possibility that enormous tracts of land could be reclaimed for agriculture by using canals to drain Florida’s Lake Okeechobee.

An application for foreclosure of the IIF and its land was filed in federal court in 1880. Negotiations to relieve the debt were held with various potential investors, including Sanford and Alexander St. Clair-Abrams, but did not come to fruition.Disston and five associates, meanwhile, entered into a land reclamation contract with the Internal Improvement Fund in January 1881.[ The contract stipulated that Disston and associates would be deeded half of whatever land his Atlantic and Gulf Coast Canal and Okeechobee Land Company reclaimed around Lake Okeechobee, the Kissimmee, Caloosahatchee and Miami Rivers. Congressman and Disston family friend, William D. “Pig Iron” Kelley, described Disston’s first contract: “He instituted broad preliminary investigations from which he received satisfactory reports; he surveyed the entire field of the proposed work, and with Napoleonic instinct and foresight saw in the proposition an opportunity to promote his country’s welfare by the reclamation of a more than kingly domain.

Disston stood to gain up to 12,000,000 acres (49,000 km2) with his drainage contract, although it would displace numerous squatters. Florida’s Armed Occupation Act of 1842 had granted land to squatters in order to force the local Seminole Indians off the land, but Disston’s contract would force the squatters off any land that Disston could show was submerged. The drainage contract, however, was in jeopardy because it did not affect the massive debt bearing down on the Internal Improvement Fund. Court orders related to the debt threatened to derail the contract so Governor William D. Bloxham visited Disston in Philadelphia to persuade him to relieve the debt. During the visit, Disston tentatively agreed to purchase four million acres (16,000 km²) of Internal Improvement Fund land for 25 cents per acre, an agreement which became a formal contract on June 1, 1881. Disston signed the contract on June 14 and The New York Times described the transaction with, “What is claimed to be the largest purchase of land ever made by a single person in the world”. It made him the largest landowner in the United States. On December 17, 1881, Disston sold two million acres (8,000 km²) of his land to English Member of Parliament, Sir Edward James Reed, for $600,000.

A photograph taken circa 1900 showing a canal dredged by Disston’s company, running through a sugar plantation also owned by Disston near St. Cloud, FloridaWhile some in Florida disapproved of the sale for giving away the land too cheaply, its positive effects on the state were undeniable.[27] In the four years following Disston’s purchase, four times as many rail lines were added than the 20 preceding years. Land sales multiplied six times after the sale and the state’s taxable property value doubled. Around 150,000 tourists came to Florida during the winter of 1884 alone.

To lure more people to Florida, Disston opened real estate offices across America as well as England, Scotland, Germany, Italy, Sweden and Denmark. He promoted himself as owning two-thirds of the entire state. These efforts drew people to the Orlando area; and the major cities of Sarasota and Naples, Florida grew out of land sold by Disston. Fort Myers became the base of his Caloosahatchee River dredging efforts and its population rapidly increased. Disston’s headquarters were on the shores of Lake Tohopekaliga and became the city of Kissimmee.

Disston “recreationed” in politics, starting as early as 1876 in local issues. He and three other industrialists in Philadelphia—James McManes, William Leeds, and David Lane— were known as the “Big Four”, controlling Republican nominations and appointments to city positions in a machine system until new political bosses replaced them in 1890. His wealth allowed him to associate with tycoons and political celebrities, and he was often sought after to advise politicians though he refused to run for office.[32] He publicly supported future president Benjamin Harrison, Congressman William D. Kelley, and political boss Matthew Quay.

In 1883, he arranged for President Chester A. Arthur, a fellow Republican, to take a fishing trip to Kissimmee as part of a large publicity campaign for the city. Disston founded a 20,000-acre (81 km2) sugar plantation, out of which sprang the city of St. Cloud. Refineries for the plantation were constructed in Kissimmee and near Lake Okeechobee.

The key to Disston’s Florida plans was a massive dredging effort to drain the Kissimmee River floodplain that flows into Lake Okeechobee, to remove the surface water in the Everglades and the surrounding lands regardless of season.[10] The canals were engineered to guide the overflow of Lake Okeechobee into the St. Lucie River and then into the Atlantic Ocean in the east; the Caloosahatchee River overflow was directed to the Gulf of Mexico in the west, and eventually canals were to be constructed south through the Everglades. Disston was advised to begin with a large canal connecting Lake Okeechobee with the St. Lucie but the prohibitive costs forced him to begin with smaller dredging operations to straighten the Kissimmee River and to connect Lake Okeechobee with the Caloosahatchee.[38] Dredging commenced around Lake Okeechobee during the winter of 1881–1882.[39] In June 1883, a report concluded that the Kissimmee valley was indeed drying up as Disston planned, and another report a year later reported further drainage with nearly 3,000,000 acres (12,000 km2) of reclaimed land credited to Disston.

Disston City

In addition to dredging, Disston’s plans included the creation of a major city in the Tampa Bay area to rival the budding city of Tampa. By 1884, he established the Lake Butler Villa Company, one of four land companies he operated. Disston founded the town of Tarpon Springs, much of which was built by Lake Butler Villa Company, including a commercial pier and two hotels, using lumber from his sawmill in Atlantic City, New Jersey. After deciding that Tarpon Springs would not become the metropolis he hoped for, Disston shifted his efforts south and established a town he called Disston City. He invested heavily in steamboats and built a wharf, a school, and the area’s first hotel.[5][36] In 1885, a Maryland doctor declared the area to be the healthiest in the world which drew many investors and developers including F. A. Davis, who partnered with Disston’s brother, Jacob, in further developing the Pinellas peninsula, where Pinellas County was established.

In the mid-1880s, Russian developer Peter Demens was building the Orange Belt Railway across central Florida with a planned western terminus in the Tampa Bay area. On December 1, 1886, Disston offered Demens approximately 60,000 acres (240 km2) of land to stretch his railroad to Disston City. Demens countered with a demand of an additional 50,000 acres (200 km2) but Disston refused, mistakenly believing that Disston City would thrive if the railroad merely came close to the area. Instead Demens terminated his railway at St. Petersburg, which he named after Saint Petersburg, his home city in Russia. While Disston City never met Disston’s expectations and became the small city of Gulfport, St. Petersburg reaped the rewards of Demens’s railway and became one of the largest cities in Florida.

Further information: Draining and development of the Everglades Disston’s success at draining peninsular Florida quickly turned to disappointment. The positive report of his drainage results in 1883 was followed by a dreadful report in 1887. While it still credited Disston with draining parts of the upper Kissimmee valley, it credited a drought with drying the area north of Lake Okeechobee. Meanwhile, Lake Okeechobee—which typically rises and falls seasonally, and is affected by the frequent flooding and droughts associate with the Florida climate—was inundated despite Disston’s canals, and the only canal out of the lake that Disston actually completed resulted in the Caloosahatchee River flooding the surrounding area. Furthermore, Disston’s planned canals to the east and south out of Lake Okeechobee had not materialized.

The 1887 commission concluded that Disston had received 1,200,000 acres (4,900 km2) which he had not earned. Disston, however, reached a compromise whereby he would keep land that he had been given in return for spending $200,000 to improve drainage including improving the flow of the canals he had already dug. In total, he dug over 80 miles (130 km) of canals and received 1,600,000 acres (6,500 km2) of land under the terms of his first drainage contract of January 1881. Although he never finished his canal plans for Lake Okeechobee, and the Everglades remained relatively unaffected by the structures intended to drain them, he was formally credited with reclaiming large portions of land and generally improving the drainage of peninsular Florida.

Regardless of the lack of success in Disston’s canals, the money he paid to the Internal Improvement Fund allowed other industrialists to take an interest in the development of Florida. In the early 1880s, railroad tycoon Henry Morrison Flagler spent a vacation in the town of St. Augustine, a brief distance south of Jacksonville, and enchanted with it, decided to build an opulent hotel there. He extended the rail line—renaming it the Jacksonville, St. Augustine & Indian River Railway—to Daytona Beach, and then to Lake Worth, then Palm Beach. As the railroad was built, citrus farms followed, and Flagler constructed hotels down the east coast, envisioning a version of the French Riviera in Florida. A friendly competition developed between Flagler and another railroad magnate named Henry Bradley Plant. While Flagler oversaw the construction of rail lines and hotels along the east coast, Plant concentrated on extending the railroad from Sanford to Tampa, crossing the state and connecting the coasts. At the terminus of this line he built the exquisite Tampa Bay Hotel, opened in 1891.

Disston himself continued living in Disston City until more bad fortune prompted his return to Philadelphia. The financial Panic of 1893, the Wilson-Gorman Tariff Act of 1894 and two devastating freezes caused financial difficulties and he mortgaged his Florida assets for $2 million.[41][45]

On April 30, 1896, Disston had dinner with the mayor of Philadelphia and attended a theatre production with his wife in Philadelphia.[45] The following morning, he was found dead at age 51. Although some claim that Disston committed suicide in his bathtub with a self-inflicted gunshot to the head, almost every obituary, as well as the official coroner’s report, stated that he died of heart disease in bed. The New York Times further reported that, several months before his death, Disston suffered from a bout of typhoid pneumonia.

He was poignantly mourned in Philadelphia as a benevolent employer of over 3,000 and a rare businessman who treated his employees exceptionally well. The Chicago Tribune wrote that he was “peculiar in his ideas. His hand was always in his pocket and his influence always for his less successful fellow-men to whom he took a fancy.” He was reported in 1889 to give $17,000 in Christmas gifts to his employees. His philanthropy branched out in other areas as well. In 1882 he sponsored the immigration of approximately 40 or 50 Russian Jewish families and purchased homes for them, assuring they would settle in Pennsylvania.

At the time of his death, Disston’s estate was valued at $100,000 but he also carried a $1 million life insurance policy, the second largest policy in the United States.[2][45] His family had no interest in Florida and creditors foreclosed on his Florida mortgage four years after his death.[45] Henry Flagler’s railroad reached a settlement of a little more than 500 people named Miami the year Disston died.

Hamilton Disston was married with a son and two daughters, all of whom survived him. He was a Presbyterian and a Mason. He was described as a fun-loving socialite as evidenced by a yacht he owned named Mischief. But he was also known as a hard-working executive whose gentle facial features were balanced with intense eyes described by one reporter as: “like that of the great eagle in the cage at the Tampa Bay Hotel, that can look straight at the sun without a tear, or even a blink.”

History from Wikipedia and OldCompany.com (old stock certificate research service).